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Friday, November 13, 2020 | History

1 edition of An economic study of a Puerto Rican sugar company found in the catalog.

An economic study of a Puerto Rican sugar company

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Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statement[Thesis presented for the degree of M.B.A. at Boston University, College of Business Administration] 1941
The Physical Object
Pagination157 pages
Number of Pages157
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL26243038M
OCLC/WorldCa7790704

Claire Jimenez is a Puerto Rican writer who grew up in Brooklyn and Staten Island, New York. She is the author of the award-winning short story collection Staten Island Stories (Johns Hopkins Press, December ), which received the Hornblower Award for a first book from the New York Society Library. Jimenez is a PhD student in English with a concentration in ethnic studies and digital.   Lee not only adds to the scholarly literature that highlights how dynamic and varied the civil rights struggles were within the growing Puerto Rican community such as the publication of the edited collection by Andrés Torres and José E. Velázquez’s, The Puerto Rican Movement: Voices from the Diaspora, and the more recent Puerto Rican.


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An economic study of a Puerto Rican sugar company by Edwin Woodland Lightfoot Download PDF EPUB FB2

The sugar corporation, the electric company, the shipping lines, the telephone company and other enterprises are owned by the government. Not unrelated to this, a Federal Power Commission study indicated that Puerto Rico’s electricity rates were the highest in all of the United States.

texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK An economic study of a Puerto Rican sugar company Item Preview remove-circle An economic study of a Puerto Rican sugar company by Lightfoot, Edwin Woodland.

Publication date Collection. Sugar and Slavery in Puerto Rico is a scholarly and substantial contribution both to Puerto Rico’s “new history” and to a fuller understanding of nineteenth-century Puerto Rico within the colonial Caribbean.

Using archival and other primary sources, Francisco Scarano has pieced together the most precise and detailed description available of the evolution of the sugar economy around Ponce Cited by: Puerto Rico - Puerto Rico - The economy: Puerto Rico’s economy, now based on services and manufacturing, was dominated by agriculture until the midth century.

Under Spanish colonial rule the island was largely neglected because of its limited mineral resources. However, the harbour at San Juan prospered as a major link in Spain’s oceanic trade routes, and massive fortifications were.

Production collapsed. Manufacturing sugar in Puerto Rico was no longer profitable. Louisiana, in contrast, continued to produce and grow sugar. We argue that local economic policy was responsible for the industry’s demise. In the s and s, the local Puerto Rican government enacted policies to stifle the growth of large cane-farms.

Sidney Wilfred Mintz (Novem – Decem ) was an American anthropologist best known for his studies of the Caribbean, creolization, and the anthropology of received his PhD at Columbia University in and conducted his primary fieldwork among sugar-cane workers in Puerto Rico.

Later expanding his ethnographic research to Haiti and Jamaica, he produced. From and sugar production increased drastically, it accounted for 40% of cultivated land, 50% of agricultural labor, and more than 30% of Puerto Rico's economic activity. The increase in the price of sugar on the world markets, as well as the investment of capital, made Puerto Rico into one of the principal producers of sugar.

Puerto Rico became an American colony inachieving self-rule after the Great Depression. The standard view is that Puerto Rican living standards stagnated before the policy changes of the New Deal and it has lost ground on the mainland since the early s.

Confronting the Crisis of the Slave-Based Plantation System in Puerto Rico: Bureaucratic Proposals for Agricultural Modernisation, Diversification and Free Labour, c. – Journal of Latin American Studies, Vol. 42, Issue. 1, p. BOOK REVIEWS. Clive Y. Thomas, Plantations, Peasants, and the State: A Study of the Mode of Sugar Production in Guyana (Los Angeles: Center for Afro-American Studies, University of California; and Mona, Jamaica: Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of the West Indies, ).

xviii, In this study, Thomas provides a lively account of the development of the Guyanese. In the s, Caño de las Nasus sold a hundred hogsheads each year. While some of these were sold in Puerto Rico, as the century wore on the island exported more of its sugar to refiners in the United States and Europe.

But satisfying America’s appetite for higher-quality sugar, and lots of it, could not happen without new machinery. The U.S. territory of Puerto Rico has made many attempts to reduce its debt burden and save its economy.

However, it proved unsuccessful, and former Governor Ricardo Rossello moved the. For a brief period in the s, Puerto Rico was touted as the “Showcase of the Caribbean,” an economic success that provided talking points against the Cuban socialist experiment.

In this innovative new book, economists from U.S. and Puerto Rican institutions address a range of major policy issues affecting the island's economic development. To frame the current situation, the contributors begin by assessing Puerto Rico's past experience with various growth s: 3. The economy of Puerto Rico is classified as a high income economy by the World Bank and as the most competitive economy in Latin America by the World Economic Forum.

The main drivers of Puerto Rico's economy are manufacturing, primarily pharmaceuticals, textiles, petrochemicals, and electronics; followed by the service industry, notably finance, insurance, real estate, and tourism. Very nice your revival of Puerto Rican sugar industry.

But, you missed an very important issue. In the 70’s and 80’s an eminent researcher at the University of Puerto Rico, Dr. Alex G. Alexander, put much effort trying to change the focus of the sugar-based one.

The company exploited the island for their economic gain, while paying the Puerto Rican sugar workers very low wages and under harsh working conditions. Despite Pedro Albizu Campos’s charismatic personality and his well-attended speeches at public gatherings urging peasants to stand up for themselves and demand respect, he was largely ignored.

In The Taste of Sugar, Vera adds an important contribution to Puerto Rican literature by chronicling the U.S. invasion of Puerto Rico, the San Ciriaco hurricane, and the mass migration to Hawaii. Throughout, Vera captures the 'trabajo y tristeza' of the Puerto Rican people.

Brava to. The latest report from Puerto Rico’s planning board paints a grim picture, estimating the impact of Hurricane Maria on the island’s economy at $43 billion, $1 billion more than the original.

In this innovative new book, economists from U.S. and Puerto Rican institutions address a range of major policy issues affecting the island’s economic development. To put it plainly: the very first governor of Puerto Rico, Charles Herbert Allen, used his “governorship” to acquire an international sugar empire, and to gain a controlling interest over the entire Puerto Rican economy.

Allen’s empire has grown over the years. You may have heard of it. It is known today, as Domino Sugar. The questions Figueroa asks violate a number of taboos existing in Puerto Rican culture about a supposed heritage of racial democracy. The answers provided debunk--permanently, I believe--standing myths about race relations in Puerto Rico."--César J.

Ayala, University of California, Los Angeles "An incredibly well-researched study. This course will investigate the economic, political, and cultural history of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Puerto Rico. This includes the history of the island as a colony of Spain and the United States, the relationship between economic modernization and cultural nationalism, and an analysis of the cycles of Puerto Rican migration.

Studying Puerto Rican history can be quite a challenge when there are minimal books on the subject. However, thanks to Luis Figueroa and Eileen Suarez (Imposing Decency) the history of Puerto Rico comes alive in a rich and historic narrative especially the internal racism.

The book speaks of Ponce which is the birthplace of my maternal grandmother. owners had taken over the production of sugar, turning Puerto Rico into a paradigmatic twentieth century monocultural plantation economy during the period The post migration unfolded against the backdrop of a Puerto Rican countryside in which highly centralized corporate capital and capitalist class relations were dominant.

The history of Puerto Rico began with the settlement of the archipelago of Puerto Rico by the Ortoiroid people between 3, and 2, BC.

Other tribes, such as the Saladoid and Arawak Native Puerto Ricans, populated the island between BC and AD.

At the time of Christopher Columbus's arrival in the New World inthe dominant indigenous culture was that of the Taínos.

Poor and orphaned at age four, the first Puerto Rican to study at Harvard, valedictorian of his Harvard Law School class, and master of six languages, Albizu Campos dedicated his life to Puerto Rican independence.

He would serve 25 years in prison. The book presents convincing evidence that radiation torture in prison hastened his death in. This study aims to trace the impact of these contacts and communications on the social history of Puerto Rico, prior to the final breakdown of Spanish power in the American continent.

It covers a broad span of time, but is particularly concerned with relations in the Eighteenth Century, a pivotal period in the development of the West Indies. These have haunted, abandoned atmospheres attributable partly to the decline of the Puerto Rican sugar industry after the abolition of slavery in (Oller was a lifelong abolitionist.).

The devastating effects of the hurricane contributed to the island’s social, economic and political crisis. The thousands of displaced peasants then became entrants into the global labor market when labor brokers from the Hawaii sugar industry began to recruit thousands of Puerto Rican.

The Puerto Rican Govern ment, in one of the most dras tic moves in recent history; has moved to expropriate an esti ma acres of sugar cane lands and a mill owned by the Aguirre Company. This is a comprehensive and detailed account of the economic history of Puerto Rico from the period of Spanish colonial domination to the present.

Interweaving findings of the new Puerto Rican historiography with those of earlier historical studies, and using the most recent theoretical concepts to interpret them, James Dietz examines the complex manner in which productive and/5(1). Walter Martin prepares a coffee in his coffee shop in the colonial district of Old San Juan, Puerto Rico, Sunday, Aug.

2, With tens of thousand migrating out of the island and the with the. Nelson A. Denis. (Photo: Mike Fitelson) Although Puerto Ricans were granted US citizenship inthe United States continued to exploit, oppress and eventually launch a “war” on the people of Puerto Rico to gain land and resources.

The book, War Against All Puerto Ricans, is a vivid, detailed account of the brutal treatment of a people “liberated” from Spain only to be subjugated by. Puerto Rican farmers successfully lobbied U.S. administrators in San Juan and Washington, participated in government-sponsored agricultural programs, solicited agricultural credit from governmental sources, and sought scientific education in a variety of public programs, all to boost their share of the tobacco-leaf market in the United States.

Decades of economic and cultural dependence on the United States did more than reshape Puerto Rico’s agricultural-dependent economy. For example, Operation Bootstrap, which began incompletely shifted Puerto Rico’s economic dependence from agriculture to manufacturing in less than 20 years.

Many people said this coerced metamorphosis from an agrarian system to an. American Challenge (Washington, D.C.: National Puerto Rican Coalition, ).

Reprinted in Journal of Hispanic Politics, 1(), Fighting Poverty: paperback edition "This is first-rate work. And if you can believe, cheering." Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan "An excellent book Each chapter contributes something.

A photograph in Frank Espada’s book “The Puerto Rican Diaspora” shows a faintly smiling man sporting a button that declares, “We Try Harder.” That detail easily applies to the subjects in the impressive portfolio Mr. Espada amassed over decades photographing Puerto. The contributions of the black population to the history and economic development of Puerto Rico have long been distorted and underplayed, Luis A.

Figueroa contends. Focusing on the southeastern coastal region of Guayama, one of Puerto Rico's three leading centers of sugarcane agriculture, Figueroa examines the transition from slavery and slave labor to freedom and free labor Reviews: 1.

When Hurricane María made landfall in Puerto Rico in Septemberit found a society long in the throes of a socio-political and economic crisis. In fact, economic downturns and recession coupled with waves of mass migration have been characteristic of the Puerto Rican experience since the early decades of American occupation.

Puerto Rico Under Spanish Rule. Puerto Rico has had more than half a millennium of recorded colonial history. On Novemin the course of his second voyage, Columbus was the first European to land on Puerto Rico.

The smallest of the Greater Antilles, Puerto Rico was then peopled by tainos, a third wave of Amerindians.The economy of Puerto Rico went through various shifts during the 20 th century. a. Mention the various economic regimes that Puerto Rico experienced in the 20 th century and their impact on the life of the Puerto Ricans.

b. Explain the economic problems which arose during the s and early s.Marketing and pricing Puerto Rican raw sugar. [Robert G Martin; O C Hester] based on reference standards. However, formatting rules can vary widely between applications and fields of interest or study.

The specific requirements or preferences of your reviewing publisher, classroom teacher, institution or organization should be applied.